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Abandoned dogs transformed by Prisoners to help Military Veterans

Abandoned dogs transformed by Prisoners to help Military Veterans

To save the lives of animals in danger while enriching the lives of people. It’s our mission statement, it’s what drives each of us at PAART. Every flight, every road trip, every late night call forces us to ask one question, what if we don’t help? What chain of events will transpire if we don’t help that one animal. People ask us what motivates you to go out and try and save an animal? The answer is that our assistance will ultimately help the men and women whose lives are changed by an animal who could have just been put down. Once in a while a mission comes along that solidifies our deep belief in the power of giving a second chance.

Animals are often found in the gravest of conditions when they enter a shelter. Durango was found living alone under a bridge. Cut off from human contact, he lived a lonely life of solitude. Buffy spent her whole life tied to a chain, never knowing the instinctual joy of roaming around, tongue waving, tail wagging, galloping with the wind blowing her ears back. She was trapped in a 6 foot diameter with no one willing to release her. Durango and Buffy, along with Peyton and River, would not have made it in a shelter. They were too far gone, too broken to be adopted.

Instead of giving up on them they were given a unique opportunity to take part in a special program with the Morgan County Animal Shelter and the Eastern Kentucky Correctional Complex. The dogs would be paired with an inmate, live inside with them in their jail cells, and slowly be trained to re-enter society. Along the way, something incredible happens to the inmate. They too start the healing process. They learn to care for something. They learn to love something. They learn to change. Inmates who participate in the program have a lower recidivism rate than other prisoners. Instead of warehousing criminals and then sending them back out, these prisoners are rehabilitated. Watching hardened men in orange jumpsuits cry when they say goodbye to their companions when they are finally ready to leave is powerful. It reminds us that without giving Durango, Buffy, Peyton, and River a second chance these boys, who are trying to become men, could have been lost to an endless stream of incarceration.

PAART Pilots Jonathan Plesset and Brian Moody would be link that connects two powerful stories. Brian is an active duty KC-135 Pilot with the Air National Guard. When he learned about the details of this incredible story he knew in his heart that he had to help. All four dogs would be flying to Pals4Pets in New York where they would be given to a Military Veternan free of charge. Buffy was adopted by Steven and his wife. He was an Air Force pilot in Vietnam. Durango would be taken home by Anthony, an Afghanistan War veternan who was suffering from PTSD. Durango would go on to become a service animal for Anthony. Peyton was adopted by Erinn, and 85 year old WW2 Nurse. River’s adoption is pending.

What if none of this had happened? What if these four dogs had just been put down? How easy would it have been to just determine that they were unfit for adoption? This story reminds us of the power of a second chance. Each step along this path has reinforced in our hearts that all lives matter. The dogs, the Military Veterans who need these positive forces in their lives, and even the prisoners whose debt to society is being paid in the good their actions brought others. Helping animals is about helping mankind. There is no better example for us than in this story. Thank you to all of the people involved in making this special mission happen. Kathy Sexton from Morgan County Animal Shelter, Laurie Norson from Pals4Pets, Jonathan Plesset, Brian Moody, Mary Kennedy Withrow, and Brittany Lewkowicz from PAART, and the inmates and handlers from the Eastern Kentucky Correctional Complex.

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Help Rescue Dogs Rescue People

Help Rescue Dogs Rescue People

Brookshire’s is donating 1% of all pet sales this May to Freedom Service Dogs of America, with all proceeds dedicated to the rescue and training of service dogs.

By rescuing dogs from shelters and custom training them to assist people with disabilities, Freedom Service Dogs of America enhances the lives of children, veterans and active duty military, adults, and man’s best friend.

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Rescue Me: How Pets Help Veterans with PTSD

Rescue Me: How Pets Help Veterans with PTSD

In this video Dr. Sarah Wooten chats to Pawrrific views about how some organisations are making a huge different in both veterans and dogs lives by bringing the 2 together.

Find out how Pets and Vets is really rescuing people and dogs and how you can get involved

The Mercury, Rescue me: How pets and vets are rescuing one another article,

Rescue me: Pets and vets are rescuing each other through Bay Area program

www.PetsandVetsUSA.com

Other videos,

Why Pets can Reduce PTSD Symptoms in Patients,

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CBS How K9 Service Dogs help Veterans at Warriors Heart and Operation Overwatch

CBS How K9 Service Dogs help Veterans at Warriors Heart and Operation Overwatch

Watch this heartfelt Great Day SA KENS5 CBS interview about how the K9 Service Dogs Program at Warriors Heart is helping warriors dealing with addiction and PTSD. KENS5 News Reporter Paul Micelles interviews Former Marine Brice Cavanaugh, Operation Overwatch Founder. Brice has his Service Dog named Monk, and talks about how the dogs are helping veterans and first responders with their long-term recovery as they move back into a daily routine. Warriors Heart is the first private residential treatment center in the US for warriors only (military, veterans, law enforcement and first responders) just outside San Antonio, Texas, in Bandera. If you or someone you know needs help, call the Warriors Heart 24-hour hotline 844-448-2567 or visit http://warriorsheart.com

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Rescue dogs help PTSD veterans reduce anxiety

Rescue dogs help PTSD veterans reduce anxiety

Rescue dogs help PTSD veterans reduce anxiety
A Sussex Police sergeant has set up a programme to train rescue dogs to support Army veterans and former emergency service workers suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).
Sgt Garry Botterill’s charity, Service Dogs UK, says the animals can help reduce anxiety in people who have PTSD and decrease “startle responses”.
The charity is hoping the scheme will be rolled out across the UK eventually
Rescue dogs help PTSD veterans reduce anxiety

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Amazing dogs help veterans with PTSD – Next Step Service Dogs

Amazing dogs help veterans with PTSD – Next Step Service Dogs

When a rescue dog with smarts and the right temperament is partnered and trained for a veteran with PTSD, a miracle often happens. A noise, sight, smell, color, or shape can trigger paralysis or a meltdown – this service dog learns to detect these triggers and avert the terror by distracting the veteran, keeping the vet in the here and now, with joy and laughter. Extreme anxiety in public places is dramatically reduced when the dog moves beside, in front, or behind the veteran, creating a protective barrier. Night terrors are interrupted when the dog licks the veteran awake. So join us, support a wonderful mission – save a dog’s life, save a veteran’s life by donating at www.nextstepservicedogs.org, thank you!